Disgaea 5 Complete Edition – Review (Switch)

The Nintendo Switch has slowing been building its collection of games throughout its five month lifespan. With new games hitting the store almost every week, it looks like Nintendo is trying to keep its promise when it comes to an abundance of third party support. And, among those games, is Disgaea 5 Complete Edition. Disgaea 5 was originally released on the Playstation 4 in 2015. The game was then ported to the Nintendo Switch in early 2017.

Disgaea 5 is a tactical role-playing game that gives you the task of defeating the demon emperor Void Dark, whose goal is to conquer the Netherworlds. Void Dark’s army The Lost hops from Netherworld to Netherworld taking down its Overlords. Overlords are the strongest demons in their respective Netherworlds. Our main character Killa runs into the Overlord of Gorgeous Seraphina while fighting Void Darks army and the two reluctantly join together. The two recruit other demons to their cause and eventually form a rebel army in order to oppose Void Dark.

Disgaea 5’s battles are fought out on a grid map. Maps have random items on them that can change the pace of battle and it is good to have a healthy collection of warriors at your disposal. You can spawn units into battle using a stationary spawn point and you can even spawn them out of battle to protect them. You do have a set number of characters that you can send into battle and once those characters are defeated you lose. Characters can be recruited at your pocket Netherworld Base. You can recruit mercenaries at higher levels and with better skills but it will cost more. At your base you can do things like buy items, weapons, take on missions, manage skils, and talk to the demons that you have already recruited. Its in this pocket world that a lot of the hilarious dialog takes place. From blown out of proportion pissing contest to laundry arguments, Disgaea 5 is not short on conversation.

In battle your army can use different skills and abilities in order to take advantage of the field around them. Characters can attack, defend, use special abilities, and even lift other characters and throw them through the air in order to clear large distances. The Prinny, a race of demon penguins that serve as Seraphina’s servants, explode when thrown making them useful to clear out group of enemies. However, the explosion kills them so you sacrifice a unit in the process.

The story of Disgaea 5 was the primary draw of the game for me. Every character has their own primary goal driving them but they also change and grow as the story moves forward. Seraphina believes that every man was designed to serve her and originally teams up with Killla so that she can make him fall in love with her but her personality changes and she becomes much more of a team player as the hours pile on in the game. You also learn a lot more about the mysterious Killa and why he wants to take down Void Dark in the first place. Dialogue is plentiful in this game but it doesn’t feel like a huge drag like it does in other Japanese RPG’s. It could be because the characters don’t feel like one dimensional placeholders.

The thing that makes Disgaea 5 Complete Edition a real winner for me has to be the form factor. Being on the Nintendo Switch I was literally able to play it anywhere. From the car to the bedroom. This freedom of control has me waiting for other games that I already own to come to the Switch so I can play it there as well.

If you couldn’t tell, Disgaea 5 is amazing. A gripping story, hilarious characters, and an interesting combat system is what sets this franchise apart from the several other games that do relatively the same thing. If you are a Switch user that loves RPG’s this is a must buy.

Disgaea 5 Complete Edition is available on Nintendo Switch for $59.99

The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild – Review (Switch)

It won’t be hard to believe that you have heard the words Zelda Breath of the Wild a lot. From t.v. to youtube everyone seems to be talking about Nintendo’s new flagship title. In short, Zelda Breath of the Wild is a masterpiece. However, don’t get me wrong, the game being a masterpiece doesn’t mean that it is without flaws. From the beginning, BotW drops you off in a world that is begging to be explored. From the snowy peaks in the northwest corner of the map to the rainforest in the southeast corner, every environment in BotW is full of life and character. In most of the open-world RPG’s I have played I tend to death grip the fast travel system and never let go. What is the point of traveling on some boring road when I can instantly be at my objective? That is a mistake when it comes to this game, rewarding exploration is the first thing that locked me into BotW’s world. 

Breath of the Wild features 120 Shrines as well as 900 korok seeds. Each shrine features a puzzle that you have to solve in order to obtain a spirit orb. With every 4 spirit orbs, you obtain you can upgrade your heart containers or your stamina. The korok seeds on the other hand allow you to upgrade the bag space of your weapons. Most of the puzzles throughout the map are simple, logic-based that get progressively difficult as you enter into hard areas. Others can be either combat challenges or tests that involve doing something in the outside world. For instance, I had to carry a ball to the center of a swirling piece of land. Now, I decided to carry it the entire way, but there were at least two other ways I could have solved that problem that I could think of. 

It is that freedom of choice that turns Zelda Breath of the Wild from a simple open-world adventure into an epic that will stand the test of time. The first thing I did in BotW was climb a tree. I walked out of the starter cave and had the instant urge to climb a tree, so I did. It was this small detail that let me know I was in for something special. And these small details are littered throughout the game. If a monster is lit on fire than there is a chance that the items they drop will be destroyed. Fire creates an updraft that you can ride on to get an aerial attack in. Wolves will try to circle around you before attacking, and if they sense too much danger they will run. The entire world isn’t reliant on you and travelers will try to fight off monsters on their own. These types of things bring a level of believability to the world. 

Monster encounters vary not only between types of monsters but by classes of monsters as well. A simple Bokoblin tends to run into your weapon by accident sometimes but later versions of this monster can not only see your attack coming but it can also learn to target your blind spots. I have never died more in a Zelda game, but every death felt justified as I learned what the game was expecting from me. Once you learn the dance, monsters will never be a problem again. Weapon degrading is a big topic of debate in BotW. Weapons in the beginning of the game will in fact break if you look at them wrong. So much so that I developed a habit of holding on to my better weapons for harder situations. This method of play is fine, but it is highly unnecessary. The rate in which you get weapons is incredibly quick with a new sword or ax around every corner. 

As I said before, Zelda Breath of the Wild is not without its flaws. While dealing with mobs of Bokoblins the game sometimes tends to lag. It has happened a total of 5 times over my 40+ hours with the game. It never happens with any creature other than the Bokoblins, for me at least. The cooking system is in serious need of a recipe book like Skyrim has because losing track of the thousands of combinations is a thing you will do. Made an awesome potion by accident, good luck duplicating the process after 10 hours of game play has gone by. Speaking of potions, what was the point of giving us an awesome potion system if you were just going to give us really easy armor that makes every potion obsolete. It would be different if you could stack effects but it is only one effect at a time. 

The main story is surprisingly easy. For reference, it took me 4 years to beat Ocarina of Time. Maybe that game was hard, maybe I suck, I like to go with the former. That being said the main story took me about 10 hours in total. The bar to beat the end boss was set very low. However, it was in that final fight that I realized that beating the end boss wasn’t why I was playing. Sure, it was the reason that Link was doing what Link was doing but I had genuinely been sucked into the world. 

The Nintendo Switch’s launch superstar seems to have managed to live up to the expectations of the general populous, and that is a great sign of things to come. I still have several hours ahead of me but I am looking forward to them with a big grin on my face. Every time I see someone discover something else I hadn’t found it makes me want to jump back in headfirst and see what else I can find. Sure, Zelda Breath of the Wild is a masterpiece, but above everything else, it is a fun experience that you don’t want to pass up.

The Legend Of Zelda: Breath of The Wild is available on Nintendo Switch for $59.99